OK, Let’s see where I stand


Sorry for the boring post, LOL, but I have to check in on the to-dos…. they say you get endorphins from checking off a “to -do,” and since it’s been threatening to pour outside, I haven’t gotten the walking endorphins (but the wine endorphin doesn’t hurt, LOL:))

1-UPDATE CALENDARs (e-mail Shelter Cal to MSK, SW, PP, CC, PBS and EGF) Done!
2-complete office paperwork and get files together to bring back along with filing for office Done!
3-head count for dinner Done!
4-grocery shopping for dinner Done!
5-clean downstairs bathroom
6-vacuum downstairs
7-Finish wash
8-motion to rescind for Br. S.
9-Check on B transcripts (do I have ’em all?)
10-other pleading responses
11-K.H. TPR responses mailed
12-Call Nancy C. re: visit with B.H.
13-Get bill from S-P and U MD for F to DW
14-Volunteer at D. Ct. Done!
15- Pick up notary commission at courthouse before or after volunteering with MCRC at D. Ct Done!
16- (New) Get music to the office for Charlene!

Well, I’ll be working… tomorrow!:)
Grandkids are here – time to play and knit/crochet:)
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Author: fuguestateknits

Wife of one, mother of six, gram of five (so far) and lawyer for many young persons, I love to sing, read, knit and walk. My politics are somewhat left of Marx and I want to hear what you think, too!

4 thoughts on “OK, Let’s see where I stand”

  1. I’ve been really reading some of your entries – and realize we have several things in common (other than PDQ Bach). I believe that’s why I enjoy your entries so much. I have two grandkiddles with autism, a girl, age 5, and her brother who just turned 4. They participate in floortime activities and lots of therapies. The older one will be entering a school program which will introduce some ABA treatments – not sure if that will work well for her but that is her parents decision – not mine. The younger one is apparently not as strongly affected by autism, but in some ways more typical. He is more rigid in his schedule – resistant to changes.
    There is so much to learn and experience with dealing with people with autism – and it is a real challenge.
    Embrace the differences and enjoy the unique-ness of the person.

  2. I’ve been really reading some of your entries – and realize we have several things in common (other than PDQ Bach). I believe that’s why I enjoy your entries so much. I have two grandkiddles with autism, a girl, age 5, and her brother who just turned 4. They participate in floortime activities and lots of therapies. The older one will be entering a school program which will introduce some ABA treatments – not sure if that will work well for her but that is her parents decision – not mine. The younger one is apparently not as strongly affected by autism, but in some ways more typical. He is more rigid in his schedule – resistant to changes.
    There is so much to learn and experience with dealing with people with autism – and it is a real challenge.
    Embrace the differences and enjoy the unique-ness of the person.

  3. Thanks so much for your comments! It’s true those “differences” sometimes are wonderful – and even hilariously funny. Sometimes Madison will come up with the funniest things. She is also learning words and retaining that learning, so thank goodness she isn’t losing her verbal ability, although there have been regressions in other areas and she does sometimes freak out in public settings.

    I don’t know much about the ABA thing – has to do with behavioral modification, right? Now that Madison has an IEP, we are hopeful that she will make progress. Right now I’m in learning mode, LOL!

    Madison’s little sister, Ruby, does not appear to have the same symptoms (for want of a better word) than Madison did, but then it’s early days yet – Ruby is only 2. Although I’ve heard this can be dx’d as early as infancy!

    Your comments are very helpful and most welcome. Thanks from the bottom of my heart!
    Joan a/k/a FSK

  4. Thanks so much for your comments! It’s true those “differences” sometimes are wonderful – and even hilariously funny. Sometimes Madison will come up with the funniest things. She is also learning words and retaining that learning, so thank goodness she isn’t losing her verbal ability, although there have been regressions in other areas and she does sometimes freak out in public settings.

    I don’t know much about the ABA thing – has to do with behavioral modification, right? Now that Madison has an IEP, we are hopeful that she will make progress. Right now I’m in learning mode, LOL!

    Madison’s little sister, Ruby, does not appear to have the same symptoms (for want of a better word) than Madison did, but then it’s early days yet – Ruby is only 2. Although I’ve heard this can be dx’d as early as infancy!

    Your comments are very helpful and most welcome. Thanks from the bottom of my heart!
    Joan a/k/a FSK

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